How to send FREE SMS from PC using Android Phone | MightyText

Fumbling with the small keyboard on your phone or searching for your phone when you need to text became a thing of the past with this app. Mighty Text allows you to send messages right from your computer without downloading any desktop clients. You don't have to memorize any of your friends' phone numbers, either. It's almost like having a SIM card in your PC or laptop.

The app works using your existing Google account and requires you to authorize the app on the Web. Once you do, all of your contact information, texts and calls are forwarded to Mighty Text. From there, you can see every message you've been sent and reply to messages with ease. Messages are sent within seconds. You'll even have the ability to attach pictures or videos to your outgoing texts. The program doesn't load your contact's pictures, but it does load incoming and outgoing calls and texts from them in the same menu. It even shows your phone's current battery so you know if it's time to take it off of the charger. To do all of this, it uses a remote connection to your phone. That means the app won't help you avoid texting charges as you might expect. If that's not a problem for you, this app is an amazing find.

This app works just as you expect it to with no complicated setup. Whether you're trying to text with a full keyboard or just don't want to get up from the couch to answer a text, Mighty Text is a standout app that offers more than most text-from-your-computer setups dream of.

Free texting service MightyText actually manages to live up to its name.

The hardest part of using MightyText is the initial setup. Like many desktop texting services, it works with Android devices only, and requires that you install a mobile app on your phone. Once the mobile app is installed and you're ready to use MightyText on your computer or tablet, you have to do a bit of tinkering with your browser's settings if you'd like to receive notifications of new messages. But MightyText guides you through the process— which involves changing some security settings in Internet Explorer or installing a third-party add-on in Firefox—and it's a one-time thing.

0 comments:

Post a Comment